EMDR

Treating Anxiety Disorders with EMDR

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Treating Anxiety Disorders with EMDR By Robin Shapiro ‘EMDR Solutions’   Everyone needs anxiety: Anxiety can be an effective early warning that something is awry: that you’ve just left your wallet at the store or that the car ahead of you is swerving erratically.  WATCH OUT! According to Daniel Siegel (2003), our bodies respond to fear-producing symptoms before we can name what’s happening. Our lower brain gets our body ready to move; then our brain tells us what to do. Anxiety can serve as a social control. (When’s the last time you picked your nose in public?) It can be a course...

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Using EMDR Therapy to Heal Your Past: Interview with Creator Francine Shapiro

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Francine Shapiro, Ph.D, first discovered and developed EMDR therapy (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) in 1987 to help people process traumatic memories. Today, EMDR is recognized by the US Department of Defense and the American Psychiatric Association as an effective treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Traumatic memories come in many types. While some may involve violence or physical abuse, others involve everyday life experiences, such as relationship problems or unemployment, according to Shapiro in her recently published book, Getting Past Your Past: Take...

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EMDR Can Build Self Esteem Faster than Talk Therapy

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Self Esteem generally gets established based on a) Feedback from the people around us–especially during childhood, and b) How much sense of mastery in our world we develop.  When feedback from parents, siblings, peers, teachers, etc is shaming, children often don’t develop good self-esteem. Children take feedback that is punishing, contemptuous, insulting, undermining, teasing, mean, neglectful, unappreciating, bullying, abusive and so on as information that they are not worth much.  When this is the source of low self-esteem, EMDR can often help, because each of these...

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How Exercise Could Lead to a Better Brain (article from the New York Times)

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Why would exercise build brainpower in ways that thinking might not? The brain, like all muscles and organs, is a tissue, and its function declines with underuse and age. Beginning in our late 20s, most of us will lose about 1 percent annually of the volume of the hippocampus, a key portion of the brain related to memory and certain types of learning. Exercise though seems to slow or reverse the brain’s physical decay, much as it does with muscles. Although scientists thought until recently that humans were born with a certain number of brain cells and would never generate more, they now...

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Rape or Childhood Sexual Abuse and Feelings of Anxiety

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Rape or Childhood Sexual Abuse and Feelings of Anxiety In my clinical practice I see many women presenting with symptoms of Anxiety: Excessive anxiety and worry Restlessness Fatigue Difficulty Concentrating Irritability Muscle Tension Sleep Disturbance Distress or Impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. This Anxiety is due unprocessed sexual trauma stored in your midbrain as unconscious material.  This unconscious material can be easily triggered and set in motion as high survival anxiety and panic attacks.  When an event triggers a neuronal connection...

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Why Time Doesn't Heal All Wounds

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Why Time Doesn't Heal All Wounds

If we cut ourselves, unless there is an obstacle, we tend to heal.  If we remove the block, the body goes back to healing. That’s why we’re willing to let ourselves be cut open during surgery. We expect incisions to heal. The brain is a part of the body. In addition to the millions of memory networks just described, we all have hardwired into our brains a mechanism – an information processing system – for healing. It is geared to take any sort of emotional turmoil to a level of mental health or what is called a level of adaptive resolution. This means a resolution that includes the...

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